So we stopped at the Bonneville Salt Flats and did this homage to Janet Jackson and Herb Ritts @JanetJackson

apiasfrepresent:

By Moana ‘Ulu’ave, APIASF/GMS Scholar
I surprised myself when I walked across the stage to receive my diploma. I assumed I’d be weepy because my ninety-year-old grandparents, fifty plus relatives/friends, parents and sisters had traveled all the way to Boston to share that walk with me. But I didn’t weep. I took in the joy. The support of hundreds of people who had made that moment possible became so real that I couldn’t help but lift my hands in triumph. My Harvard diploma is not mine, it belongs to my Glendale neighborhood, the Tongan diaspora, Niua, and in many ways to my grandparents, parents, and sisters. I was just the vessel walking across the stage.
Moana ‘Ulu’ave graduated from Harvard University. There, she earned her Ed.M. in Arts in Education. She is also a recipient of Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Intellectual Contribution/Faculty Tribute Award. 
To read more about Moana’s commitment to her Tongan American community and her educational experiences, check out her interview with HGSE here.

apiasfrepresent:

By Moana ‘Ulu’ave, APIASF/GMS Scholar

I surprised myself when I walked across the stage to receive my diploma. I assumed I’d be weepy because my ninety-year-old grandparents, fifty plus relatives/friends, parents and sisters had traveled all the way to Boston to share that walk with me. But I didn’t weep. I took in the joy. The support of hundreds of people who had made that moment possible became so real that I couldn’t help but lift my hands in triumph. My Harvard diploma is not mine, it belongs to my Glendale neighborhood, the Tongan diaspora, Niua, and in many ways to my grandparents, parents, and sisters. I was just the vessel walking across the stage.

Moana ‘Ulu’ave graduated from Harvard University. There, she earned her Ed.M. in Arts in Education. She is also a recipient of Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Intellectual Contribution/Faculty Tribute Award.

To read more about Moana’s commitment to her Tongan American community and her educational experiences, check out her interview with HGSE here.

postracialcomments:

cunnilingustips:

soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision , Tumblr: soulrevision , Facebook: soulrevision , Twitter: soulrevision]

93 years ago on this day May 31, 1921, the Tulsa Race Riot began. It is marked as the deadliest race riot in the history of the U.S. & destroyed what was known as, Black Wall Street.

Black Wall Street was the wealthiest black community in the United States, full of black owned businesses consisting of: 

movie theaters 
dental offices
independent newspapers
restaurants
grocery stores
a bank
post offices
a bus system
schools
airplanes
law offices 
its own hospital.

Racial tension boiled over on May 30, 1921 when a white woman accused a black boy of sexual assault. Late that night, a mob of nearly 10,000 white men launched an all out assault on Black Wall Street systematically burning down every home & business. 

Attacks came from both the ground and the sky as the mobs used planes from World War I to drop firebombs and shoot at residents. African Americans that were captured were held in internment camps around the city by local police & National Guard units.

Blacks who were injured during the 16 hour attack couldn’t seek medical care because the mobs torched the only black hospital in the city.

The attack left about 10,000 African Americans homeless and 35 city blocks burned to the ground. In total, 1,256 houses & 191 businesses (including churches, a middle school & a hospital) were burned. 

In the aftermath, it was estimated that 300 African Americans were killed and many of their bodies were buried in unmarked graves.

The Tulsa Race Riot was taught for the 1st time in Tulsa public schools in 2012. #NeverForget #BlackWallStreet #BlackHistory

I have never heard of this. You’d think this was a pretty important piece of American history to leave out of history books.

there have been over 300 documented bombings of Black neighborhood and businesses. I’ve seen historians claim over thousands of incidents like this that have been swept under the rug and forgotten.

"Pākehā have developed a range of strategies to deal with these uncomfortable truths. One such strategy is the art of selective amnesia… ability to forget vast chunks of history as and when it suits. Another is denial and distortion of the truth, for example, insisting that colonisation was overwhelmingly a positive experience for Māori…Pākehā…assume the mantle of victimhood, for example, by complaining that any initiative designed to assist Māori constitutes an unjustifiable assault on Pākehā rights."

Ani Mikaere-‘Racism in Contemporary Aotearoa: A Pākehā Problem’  (via youbecarefulnow)

(via kakaimeitahi)

kawahineaihonua:

Legendary author Maya Angelou hosted “An Evening With Maya Angelou” for a sold-out crowd at the Andrews Amphitheatre at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on June 21, 1994, according to the magazine Malamalama.
The following is an excerpt from the magazine’s coverage of the event:
"Angelou spoke of the importance of romantic love and self love, quoting other poets—both famous and obscure—as often as she did her own work.  ‘You need to know African-American poetry, poetry on love, you need to know it,’ she told an audience whose enthusiasm was undaunted by rain. ‘Words are music.’"
After the program, Angelou was presented with the first-ever UH Medal of Distinction.
The medal was established to honor individuals of national and international stature for lifetime accomplishments, a record of distinguished service to the community and/or outstanding scholarly achievements.

kawahineaihonua:

Legendary author Maya Angelou hosted “An Evening With Maya Angelou” for a sold-out crowd at the Andrews Amphitheatre at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on June 21, 1994, according to the magazine Malamalama.

The following is an excerpt from the magazine’s coverage of the event:

"Angelou spoke of the importance of romantic love and self love, quoting other poets—both famous and obscure—as often as she did her own work.  ‘You need to know African-American poetry, poetry on love, you need to know it,’ she told an audience whose enthusiasm was undaunted by rain. ‘Words are music.’"

After the program, Angelou was presented with the first-ever UH Medal of Distinction.

The medal was established to honor individuals of national and international stature for lifetime accomplishments, a record of distinguished service to the community and/or outstanding scholarly achievements.

(via kakaimeitahi)

rogishnriches:

universalequalityisinevitable:

David Suzuki in this interview about facing the reality of climate change and other environmental issues from Moyers & Company.

Real as it gets…..

(via vava-u-princess-deactivated2014)

carlos-gadbois:

REST IN BEAUTIFUL PEACE………

YOU SHALL BE MISSED……

(via postracialcomments)